• Uncategorized
SSH Key based authentication.

Administering a large number of servers is never easy. Sometimes it’s necessary to streamline many “menial” tasks across the board. This is especially true when performing simple audits across all your linux and unix based servers.

What makes this process seamless and efficient is to implement ssh key authentication to replace password based authentication.

When implemented, commands can be executed via scripts in order to execute and gather all the information that’s required in order to complete your task.

Sound easy? It is!

Public Key Setup

First, confirm that OpenSSH is the SSH software installed on the client system. Key generation may vary under different implementations of SSH. The ssh -V command should print a line beginning with OpenSSH, followed by other details.

Key Generation

A RSA key pair must be generated on the client system. The public portion of this key pair will reside on the servers being connected to, while the private portion needs to remain on a secure local area of the client system, by default in ~/.ssh/id_rsa. The key generation can be done with the ssh-keygen(1) utility.

Depending on your work environment and the security policies and procedures, you may want to enter a passphrase. This effectively defeats the purpose of this, however. Entering an empty passphrase will allow you to complete a seamless connection.

The file permissions should be locked down to prevent other users from being able to read the key pair data. OpenSSH may also refuse to support public key authentication if the file permissions are too open. These fixes should be done on all systems involved.

Key Distribution

The public portion of the RSA key pair must be copied to any servers that will be accessed by the client. The public key information to be copied should be located in the ~/.ssh/id_rsa.pub file on the client. Assuming that all of the servers use OpenSSH instead of a different SSH implementation, the public key data must be appended into the ~/.ssh/authorized_keys file on the servers.

first, upload public key from client to server:

next, setup the public key on server:

Be sure to append new public key data to the authorized_keys file, as multiple public keys may be in use. Each public key entry must be on a different line.

Many different things can prevent public key authentication from working, so be sure to confirm that public key connections to the server work properly. If the following test fails, consult the debugging notes.

Key distribution can be automated with module:authkey and CFEngine. This script maps public keys stored in a filesystem repository to specific accounts on various classes of systems, allowing a user key to be replicated to all systems the user has access to.

If exporting the public key to a different group or company, consider removing or changing the optional public key comment field to avoid exposing the default username and hostname.

Easy!